post

It is very likely that the most complicated thing you have done on the web is to upload of a photo of the canvas prints hanging on your wall. You have so much pride in the canvas prints you purchased from an online store and wanted everybody to share your excitement. However, have you ever wondered how the website you interacted with was created?

If you are not familiar with computer programming, creating web design, layout and all can be pretty intimidating but it is not actually as daunting as you imagine. When a web designer is asked to create a webpage using a certain font, header, color, images and an animated dog walking across the screen when a user clicks on a button, the designer gets the big idea and takes it apart into several pieces. These pieces are translated into instructions that computers understand. However, all the instructions have to be organized into correct order and syntax.

Every page on the web is built using a sequence of separate instructions that come one after the other. Your browser which can either be Chrome, Firefox or Safari translates the code into something that users will see on screen or even interact with. Magic happens when the browser fetches HTML and other programming languages used and interprets them.

In the early days of the internet, HTML was the only programming language used by web developers and they had to patiently code static sites, page by page. Nowadays, aside from HTML, there is CSS, JavaScript and other computer programming languages. Every web professional understands the importance of HTML no matter the complexity of the site and the number of technologies involved in design.

Anyone who is trying to create content for the web must know HTML because every web page is made up of HTML tags that denote each type of content on the page. For example, if you are reading the words canvas prints on this website, you are reading a part of a paragraph that is coded with an opening paragraph tag: <p>. The tag part is indicated by open brackets while the letter “p” tells the computer that you are opening a paragraph and not some other type of content.